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Tuesday, 20 October 2009

Wordless Wednesday: The Piet Oudolf Millennium Garden, Pensthorpe.















25 comments:

Kiki said...

These are truly stunning photos! I love the echinacea of course, the gorgeous butterfly or moth ontop..so beautiful! And my other fave is the sea of white echinacea.wow!!..so nice to see a large grouping like that!! Wonderful job..all the photos are super lovely!!It must have been fun taking photos!

Chris said...

Lovely series of shots, though melancholy as we slip into Autumn.....

The Galloping Gardener said...

This is one of my favourite gardens in the world - so glad you featured it. Did you enjoy the birds too??

azplantlady said...

Such a beautiful garden! I especially like the ornamental grasses.

cherry said...

What a beautiful place thank you for sharing.
hugs, Cherry

fairegarden said...

As a certifiable Pietaholic, I thank you! This garden has been featured in his books, and I love seeing it through your lens. Well done! :-)
Frances

DoanLegacy said...

These photos are absolutely gorgeous! They are so peaceful and beautiful!

Ms B said...

I like it!

[Psst. If I am being totally honest I am not sure about your new surroundings. They detract from your lovely photos. Sorry :( ]

Rothschild Orchid said...

Hi Mrs B. Yes I'm not sure either, thought I would trial it, but I miss the black!

Yes I did enjoy the birds too GG :o)

Thanks for all the lovely comments. I loved this garden. I visited it on a gorgeously sunny September afternoon. It was certainly worth the drive into Norfolk.

Rosey Pollen said...

superbly lovely and the butterflies are stunning here! thanks for sharing this lovely garden.
Rosey

catsynth said...

That's quite a dramatic garden. I like the way the colors subtly move in and out, e.g., some purples together in an amorphous shape, and then zooming in to see the individual flowers and the butterflies.

Bay Area Tendrils Garden Travel said...

This gorgeous post triggered an impulsive.... Ahhhhhh!
the moment I arrived on the page!
I am truly ready for a return trip to G.B., now, I just have to figure out how to afford it! Norfolk is one more region I've yet to explore.
Thank you for the virtual visit, Alice

Ryan said...

Absolutely gorgeous pics!

When did you visit? And what was your highlight?

Ryan

Anna said...

This looks like a really magical garden - must, must visit ! Enjoyed your post :)

Joanne said...

Whay a lovely garden and great photos.

Rothschild Orchid said...

Hi Ryan, I visited the garden in the first week of September and it was quite late in the afternoon, but the light was fantastic. It made the grasses glimmer as they danced in the afternoon breeze. I have wanted to see some of Piet's planting for quite some time having seen so many articles on him. I wasn't dissapointed by what I found! The sea of white Echinacea's were quite something in the hazy sunlight with a plethora of drunken butterflies and bees all over them. I think next year I shall have to seek out a few more of Piet Oudolf's gardens ;o)

Lucy said...

Chicago!

And as well as 'how beautiful!' and feeling air breathing inside . . . I was thinking 'However much did all this cost?'.

I'm glad you've gone back to black.

Totally off the point but . . . if you were chosing your o'level subjects and you hoped to make archaeology your career but were only allowed to take eight - what would they be? It would be really helpful to know . . . not to me personally (beyond o'levels, thankfully!) but for the person having to decide the 'eightness' makes it difficult to see how the necessaries can be fitted in.

Anything you could say?

Lucy

Rothschild Orchid said...

I wouldn't advise anyone to go into archaeology these days, there are no jobs, certainly in England anyway. By the end of the credit crunch it is estimated that at least one third of all professional archaeologists will have been made redundant. It is a profession with far too many people, and too few jobs. It's rather like a dead mens shoes if you ever want to progress up the ladder, not unsimilar to Terry Pratchett's Wizards at Unseen Univerity. Nevermind GCSE's, you can't even secure a job with a good PhD at the moment!

Saying all that if they want to keep all their options open, History, Geography, Latin, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths and English. Oh and French would be useful as most commercial archaeology units are now woking in France these days!

Lucy said...

Thanks for the information / suggestions.

I will pass it on.

I think she will be disappointed about the French because she would much rather do Spanish and German. I don't think she's much struck on physics and is wishing a space could be made for art. The others are on the list already though. (Including the Latin.)

But even your list comes out at nine!

Lucy

Rothschild Orchid said...

If she can avoid having to do the Physics that wouldn't be a problem, but the biology and chemistry are very useful. Art again would be a good skill to have under the belt! I wouldn't worry too much at this level. It is more improtant to get the right specialism's at University than anything.

I do really stongly suggest she researches how terrible the profession is before she makes any serious committment to archaeology. Many toilet attenants are better paid than archaeologists. The average salary is about £16K a year... Most people in archaeology are either very poor or have a very well off spouse!!!

Good Luck!

Lucy said...

Sorry, I'm adding rather a lot of words to your Wordless Wednesday. But, once again, thanks for the advice. I'll pass it on . . . though I don't think I'll labour the paucity of openings etc.. She's not quite fourteen yet and I think it's good to have an idea at least upon which to imagine your future, it gives a focus. My theory is that it can help you work out what you really do and don't like doing and that if you study the things you really love - you've more of a chance of having a happy life than if you follow a course simply because you think it will pay well. Unless you are making money your goal, that is! . . . though I doubt that an un-nerving enthusiasm for Latin is likely to lead one into anything especially lucrative!

Lucy

Rothschild Orchid said...

Hi Lucy,

I'll just add one final thing. If she is still interested in archaeology when it comes around to her doing work experience she should try and get a placement with a local commercail unit. Many units take young people interested in archaeology on work placements. That is how I got my first taste of archaeology at the tender age of 14. Now one of the most rewarding things in my job is being able to show work experience students what we do.

RO :o)

HappyMouffetard said...

Gorgeous photos. I'm looking at doing a bit of prairie planting myself (in a miniature version) so thise photos were very well timed.

Rothschild Orchid said...

I'm must admit I am toying with the idea of doing some at Tumbledown, there is certainly room to :o)

Karen - An Artist's Garden said...

How did I miss this post? - Oh I remember I have been soooo busy -

Love these images - so inspirational and thank you for the tour.
K